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Solving life's special needs.


Solutions for families and corporations dealing with autism, ADHD, and similar social challenges at all ages.

Employment Advice for Individuals With Autism

Identifying interests and non-interests at an early age is an important skill for development. This interest could potentially foreshadow what a child could do well in the future. Dr. Shore, who has ASD, indicated that as a teenager he loved repairing bicycles. He decided to approach the shop manager at the local bicycle shop and discussed his interest and passion in repairing bikes; ultimately he received a job offer to work at that store. Read more here.

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20 Best Value Colleges for Students with Autism 2017-2018

The symptoms of Autism (or in its less severe form, Asperger’s Syndrome) cause challenges that can persist throughout life. Daily functioning can be especially difficult for college students with ASD, who may struggle to make friends, communicate with professors, and adapt to the dynamic environment of a college campus. Fortunately, some colleges have developed support programs that uniquely cater to the needs of students “on the spectrum.” Read more here.

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14 must-have life skills for teens

If you’re wondering how your teen will survive on their own, don’t worry too much — chances are your child is a lot more capable than you think. Even so, now is a good time to teach your teen a few practical skills that will leave both of you feeling a little more confident about your offspring’s readiness to leave the nest. Read more here.

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Read This Story and Get Happier - The most popular course at Yale teaches how to be happy. We took it for you.

In the face of this epidemic of unhappiness, Santos decided to design a course in “positive psychology” — i.e., the field of study that focuses on well-being, as opposed to psychological dysfunction. Such classes have been around for more than a decade, but they typically served as introductions to the field — sort of Happiness 101. Santos’s course aims to do more. Read more here.

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3+1 Reasons to Make Social, Emotional, and Academic Development a Priority

For me, there are three main arguments for taking an integrated approach to students' social, emotional, and academic development: (1) improving academic achievement; (2) preparing students to succeed in the world of work; and (3) addressing the civic mission of schools. Social and emotional competencies are instrumental to student success in each of these domains. Read more here. 

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Op-ed: Your next great employee might have Autism

During Autism Awareness Month, the national conversation around autism tends to focus on children. We hear the statistic that one in 68 children in the United States have some form of autism, a neuro-developmental disorder. We hear that autism is on the rise and that no one yet knows why. Amidst these concerns, we may overlook the fact that autistic children grow up to be autistic adults, comprising one of the most promising but untapped workforces in the country. Read more here.

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Cast Aside | Autism's cliff to nowhere

This so-called tsunami --- some half a million young adults with autism --- are turning 22 in the next five to 10 years. For many, it means aging out of many programs, schools and services, that were mandated. Read more here. 

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Relationship Matters: Why socializing is a must, not an option

All individuals are born with their own personality, talents, cognitive curiosity, socializing proclivity, unique preferences, interests, cultural and later religious family affiliations and develop the social skills needed to relate to others. The most important issue to healthy human development is knowing that one is valued, cared about, protected and safe... Read more here. 

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Mom Power: How Two Houston Moms Created a Nonprofit Organization to Meet the Needs of Their Autistic Children

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                             Contact: Wendy Dawson, Executive Director                                                                                                           Phone: (O) 713.461.7200 / (C) 713.705.6851                                                                                                           Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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Inside the tweener’s brain

The tweens and early teens of sixth, seventh, and eighth grade are often hormone-addled, pimpled, unpredictable narcissists, rudely defiant one second and emotionally clingy the next. They’ve probably calculated that you’re not as completely cool as Taylor Swift, Ed Sheeran, Stephen Curry, or even their faddishly-dressed BFF — and they let you know it. You may wonder if your precious child’s body is inhabited by aliens. Honestly, close guess — those invading “aliens” are hormones. Read more here. 

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Adults with autism bring special talents to the workplace -- employers would be lucky to have them

Individuals on the spectrum see things differently and can bring new perspectives to ways of working and thinking. They often have novel approaches to problem solving and working because of their unique thought processes. With encouragement to be different, employees on the spectrum can bring a whole new level of innovation to an organization. Read more here.

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A Look Inside An Autism-Friendly Workplace And Culture

Our discussion started with the enormous grassroots activity of the past few years, the expanding corporate autism employment initiatives, and the explosion of autism in popular culture. Our focus, though, became workplace culture. Many in our autism community did get jobs, only to lose them shortly thereafter. So much of current workplace culture makes retention of adults on the autism spectrum an uphill struggle. Read more here.

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Why 'High Functioning' Autism Is So Challenging

The fact is that life with severe autism is extraordinarily difficult. Logic would suggest that people on the high end of the spectrum have it easy—as do their families and teachers. After all, people with high functioning autism are often very bright and may have impressive talents. But the reality is quite different. Read more here. 

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Spectrum Designs Expansion Inspires Documentary

Mackey decided to film a feature-length documentary, This Business of Autism, about Spectrum Designs’s move down the street to a larger facility that will enable the organization to employ 50 more workers. But soon the film took on a life of its own, as it morphed into a larger story about opportunities for adults with autism throughout the country. Read more here.

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Matt manages a team of people - he's never spoken to any of them

When Ryan Mattock, co-founder of startup CommissionCrowd, needed to recruit a web developer three years ago, he received an inquiry from a potential employee, Matt Skillings.

Their conversation, over email, led to Skillings being hired by Mattock. He is now the company’s chief development officer and leads a team of four. But Mattock and his colleagues have never spoken over the phone with Skillings, or met him in person. Read more here. 

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He's got the will. Can he find a way?

In the past decade, Tom Whalen, a 27-year-old Baltimore County man, has had jobs at an animal shelter, a mailroom, multiple grocery stores, a doggy day-care center and a landscaping company. He is chatty, outgoing and engaging, quick to win over strangers and ask for opportunities. Then, in short order, he loses them.

"He could get jobs," says his mother, Sue.

"The problem is maintaining them," adds his father, Ed. Read more here.

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Promoting neurodiversity - A pilot program at EY recruits workers with autism

Though communication and social interactions can be difficult, many with autism excel at data analysis, looking at problems from different angles and spotting solutions that may elude others. Data analysis is a needed skill in accounting, and those with autism can excel in environments that meet their needs — often a quiet workplace without significant distractions. Read the full story here.

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Autism-Related Challenges Persist Well Into Adulthood, Study Shows

As adults with autism mature and move into middle age, they are finding it difficult to live independently, hold down jobs and sustain relationships, researchers say.

A new study is providing a glimpse into the daily lives of adults with autism as they hit their 30s and 40s, a time period that’s traditionally received little attention from researchers looking at the developmental disorder. Read the full story here.

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Is Nonverbal Communication a Numbers Game?

How often have you heard someone say over 80% (or even 90%) of communication is body language or nonverbal?  Perhaps even you might have said it, but do you know where it originates from?

The numbers represent the percentages of importance that varying communication channels have. The belief is that 55% of communication is body language, 38% is the tone of voice, and 7% is the actual words spoken. Read the full story here.

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Employees on autism spectrum are bringing excellence and acceptance to workplace

Education and therapy techniques have made tremendous strides in teaching the way an autistic student can learn, but what happens after degrees are earned? Very capable and eager pools of employees are passed up because the poise factor may never be displayed in the typical job interview.

Major companies are making decisions to catch up for lost time and specifically capture employees from the autistic community. Read the full story here.

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